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  • I hate the butchery of language this show does. Gelu is a latin noun that means 'ice' hence gelato. Cold is frigidus. But, gelus is an adjective, gelum (singular dative) that means 'zealous'. Seriously this takes less the 5 min if you consult a g*ddamn dictionary. Man up Grimm writers

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    • Well screw you. Also, they have to create a memorable name.

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    • They did create a memorable name, but knowing that gelum means zealous and not cold takes  a double check. That is simple fact checking.

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    • Um haven't you thought that maybe that's what the writers intended the name to mean? Kinda like they're the "Zealous Killers"? Just because the episode name is "Cold Blooded" doesn't mean it has to be part of the wesen's name

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    • My gods this guy that wrote this needs to do a little more then just see one word and immediately think, oh the Wesen has to be an ice kind, besides the name of the episode could also mean it's just a freaking reptile type of wesen, they are cold blooded too dude.

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    • Etymology on this one wasn't easy, either. Both words are nouns that are more than likely to be misinterpreted in English as different parts of speech, so I can see why they ended up with two incorrect words when they named it.

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    • The name sounds pretty good when you don't worry about the definitions

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    • PDXBlazer wrote:
      The name sounds pretty good when you don't worry about the definitions

      But that's the point!  The purpose of a word is to have a meaning, thus when I say cat, kat, gato, chat, neko, or koshka around the world someone thinks "Oh that furry four legged thing that purrs and plays with balls of string". The arrangement of letters in a particular order refers to an idea within the semantic universe. This show does a shitte job, of recognizing simple things like:  Mausherz, NOT Mauzhertz. Hertz is a physical unit of frequency denoting a single cycle per second. However it SOUNDS like herz, because im Deustch 'z' is pronunced 'ts'.  Mauz isn't a word, but Maus is. This literally took less than 5 min to correct. 

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    • Within the show's mythology all the names supposedly derive from a time at least 500 years ago, To follow your example, (just in English) cat, catt, catte, Kat, Katt, and Katte all refet to the purring, string player and can be found in written material from the late middle ages and the early modern period .It is only within the last 150 - 200  years that spelling has become standardised in western alphabet writing. The spelling before standardization was entirely based on the sound of the word and so varied from region to region based on the local dialect, so an English speaker in Germany would spell a term entirely according to his/her own phonetic rules. The Griim Diaries and Rosalee's books are secret writings passed on through family and Master/Apprentice lines, not for general publication. It is entirely possible that the spellings found in any material owned by Maya and inherited from her ancestors would differ from that in Nick's library. Furthermore since the world of a Grimm is by necessity hidden, the names being almost correct, but in fact nonsensical means that they are likely to be discounted if discovered by the uninitiated, further protecting the secret.

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    • Actually, Dragonfighter has a point. Out here, there is a bird (the house sparrow) which we call a spatzie. That's not a word in German, but it comes from a German word that means "sparrow". This bird is the only local bird that belongs to the family the Europeans call sparrows, so it's technically an accurate name, but it was probably initially called the Spatz (SHPAATS) and gradually evolved into spatzie (SPAT-see)-- note the pronunciation has been butchered as well.

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    • I understand your point. I had to read Chaucer and Beowulf in college and recognize the evolution of standardized orthography. But when i go to church, my pastor says in the Lord's prayer as "Our father who art in heaven..." not "Faeder ure, thu the eart on heofonum". When it's been dry outside I don't use the word 'droghte', I say 'drought'. 

      Yes, in times prior to the implementation of standardized education people had greater variability in their spelling. But times are different. 

      Bob, I'm guessing your from somewhere in Pennsylvania or the upper midwest. 

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    • You make part of my point when you use "art" for "is", as the various forms of the verb "to be" have changed over time. Primarily what i was saying is that the series is entertainment and not a German language primer.

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    • 108.57.82.229 wrote: Yes, in times prior to the implementation of standardized education people had greater variability in their spelling. But times are different.

      Keep in mind, though, that the backstory of Grimm relies upon a fictitious population of German immigrants who would have already established words for the Wesen before teaching their children English and before learning to spell.

      108.57.82.229 wrote:

      Bob, I'm guessing your from somewhere in Pennsylvania or the upper midwest. 

      Close. Southern Midwest.

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    • why so much hate against whoever make this post?; Grimm does a shitty job with a lot of wesen names... even the word "wesen" is mispronounced. I don't think that makes the show less enjoyable, just show that writers can be sometimes a littly lazy, I don't get why everyone is so hard in him or her to point it out.

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    • 186.36.45.225 wrote:
      why so much hate against whoever make this post?; Grimm does a shitty job with a lot of wesen names... even the word "wesen" is mispronounced. I don't think that makes the show less enjoyable, just show that writers can be sometimes a littly lazy, I don't get why everyone is so hard in him or her to point it out.

      By the way, I make that post, I just forget I wans't logged in

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    • No hate here, but I think that the writers do the faux german (and other languages) thing deliberately in order to strengthen the backstory mentioned by Bob above.

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    • I actually noticed David pronounced Dämonfeuer correctly last week! Of course, two words later, he said HUND-jag-ger instead of HOONT-yay-ger.

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    • Some of the actors say the names wrong on purpose. I think Bitsie said they are given 2 or 3 ways to pronounce names including the correct way, but she said some characters say names wrong because if you don't know much about the language, what are the odds you pronounce the name correctly?

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    • A Grimmster
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