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Jiskran

aka Alexander

  • I live in Brno, Czech Republic (have done since 1995)
  • My occupation is English teacher (also since 1995)
A Grimmster
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  • Hey Jiskran, not sure if you know any Latin, but I need the translation for Furis Rubian double checked -- is it "The Red Devil"?  Thanks

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    • No, it's more "Ruby (as a shade) thief" (a joke in itself, since the Latin 'furis' is thief, and 'rubare' in Italian is 'to steal'). Hope that helps. :)

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    • Ok, that's one translation I definitely saw, it just seems like "The Red Devil" would make more sense.  Sometimes the writers use more of a loose translation than a precise one, so do you think that might be the case here?  This was the online source I used to come up with The Red Devil translation: http://latin-dictionary.net/search/latin/

      Thanks for your help, just wanted to know your thoughts on that.

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    • Yes, if the intention was 'furia', that is the demonic spirit English labels a Fury, as in Alecto, Tisiphone and Megaera, and with a certain flexibility the 'rubian' could be seen as a form of red.

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    • Ok, interesting... I think I will make a note in the Trivia section about the literal translation of the Wesen name, but I'm gonna guess just based on the context of the episode that they meant for the Wesen name to mean "The Red Devil."

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    • A Grimmster
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  • Hello, fellow Grimmster & editor!  I saw you're an English teacher, so I thought you might (or is it may? haha) be able to help me out with a English-related question.  I am attempting to write what was written in a Grimm diary entry, but unfortunately, some of the words or sentences were cut off on the screen and were not shown in their full entirety. One sentence reads, "I've decided to check on..." with the next word starting with the letter "h". I can't quite determine from the context of the diary entry whether it is "him" or "her", though I do suspect it probably says "him".  Anyways, the rest of the sentence reads, "...every night until he crosses a line."  The next word or next few words are cut off, but the first word begins with the letter "M", and then the next line reads "...not hesitate to end his miserable..." with the next word being what I really think is "life" but am not sure because all you see is the first two letters.

    How would you quote this?  Something like, "I've decided to check on h-- every night until he crosses a line... not hesitate to end his miserable li--"?  Just not sure what the proper way of doing that is, so if you can help, that'd be great.  Thanks!

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    • "I've decided to check on... every night until he crosses a line"

      I think?

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    • I could do that, though my preference is to try to keep some of the words or indicate that they are unreadable/cut-off.  I wasn't sure if there was a way to indicate that.  I know when words are misspelled, and that misspelling is quoted, you use [sic] after the word, maybe there's something similar to that in this scenario?  I figure if anyone knows the answer to that, Jiskran might.  I was also thinking of putting the word "life" in brackets on that last sentence "not hesitate to end his miserable [life]", though I'm not sure if I have the leeway to interpret the end of the sentence that way.

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    • We've dealt with this kind of situation on some Wesen(?) articles, but I don't remember how we did things/which articles

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    • Grimmaniac, your first idea, with dashes, is the traditional way to transcribe such as diary entries when the text becomes illegible. However, for clarity and to avoid endless debate and amendments, it might be safer to skip the words which are unclear, so that (hopefully) other users are less tempted to put it right. Either way, it might well be worth stating and setting out somewhere in the policies pages here your final approach. PDXBlazer and I were discussing, a couple of months ago, the placement of quotation marks, although it seems the US and British usages differ here. To me, only those pieces of punctuation in the original form belong inside the inverted commas, but current American usage seems to include commas or full stop where they mark the end of a clause or sentence. In short, I believe most approaches to the matter of transcription can work well, as long as you are consistent, and your specific style is clearly explained.

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    • A Grimmster
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  • Hi, welcome to the Grimm Wiki! You are receiving this automated message because you made your first edit or comment. Thanks for your edit to the Adalind Schade page!

    Please leave me a message if I can help with anything; you may also want to visit the forums.

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    • A Grimmster
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